Packers NFL Draft 2013: Meet the draft class

Posted by Duke Bobber on April 27, 2013 – 11:15 pm

This draft class gives the Packers a tough look

This draft class gives Packers a tough look

Running backs join emphasis on defenseRead More

DRAFT RECAP VIDEOS

Meet the players

1. Datone Jones, DE, UCLA
2. Eddie Lacy, RB, Alabama
4a. David Bakhtiari, T, Colorado
4b. J.C. Tretter, T, Cornell
4c. Johnathan Franklin, RB, UCLA
5a. Micah Hyde, CB, Iowa
5b. Josh Boyd, DE, Mississippi State
6. Nate Palmer, LB, Illinois State
7a. Charles Johnson, WR, Grand Valley State
7b. Kevin Dorsey, WR, Maryland
7c. Sam Barrington, LB, South Florida

Datone Jones

#95 DATONE JONESDE – UCLA – HT: 6-4 – WT: 285 – Drafted 1st Round, #26 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

Green Bay Packers RB Eddie Lacy

#27 EDDIE LACYRB – ALABAMA – HT: 5-11 – WT: 230 – Drafted 2nd Round, #61 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

T David Bakhtiari

#69 DAVID BAKHTIARIT – COLORADO – HT: 6-4 – WT: 300 – Drafted 4th Round, #109 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE

T J.C. Tretter

J.C. TRETTERT – CORNELL – HT: 6-4 – WT: 307 – Drafted 4th Round, #122 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

RB Johnathan Franklin

JOHNATHAN FRANKLINRB – UCLA – HT: 5-10 – WT: 205 – Drafted 4th Round, #125 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

CB Micah Hyde

MICAH HYDECB – IOWA – HT: 6-0 – WT: 197 – Drafted 5th Round, #159 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

DE Josh Boyd

JOSH BOYDDE – MISSISSIPPI STATE – HT: 6-3 – WT: 310 – Drafted 5th Round, #167 Overall

AUDIO/VIDEO

additional coverage

LB Nate Palmer

NATE PALMERLB – ILLINOIS STATE – HT: 6-2 – WT: 248 – Drafted 6th Round, #193 Overall

AUDIO

WR Charles Johnson

CHARLES JOHNSONWR – GRAND VALLEY STATE – HT: 6-2 – WT: 215 – Drafted 7th Round, #216 Overall

AUDIO

WR Kevin Dorsey

KEVIN DORSEYWR – MARYLAND – HT: 6-1 – WT: 207 – Drafted 7th Round, #224 Overall

AUDIO

LB Sam Barrington

SAM BARRINGTONLB – SOUTH FLORIDA – HT: 6-1 – WT: 235 – Drafted 7th Round, #232 Overall

AUDIO


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NFL, officials come to agreement

Posted by Duke Bobber on September 26, 2012 – 11:20 pm

Joint statement from NFL and NFLRA

The NFL and NFLRA are pleased to announce that they have reached an agreement tonight on an eight-year collective bargaining agreement, subject to ratification by the NFLRA.

“Our officials will be back on the field starting tomorrow night,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said. “We appreciate the commitment of the NFLRA in working through the issues to reach this important agreement.”

“Our Board of Directors has unanimously approved taking this proposed CBA to the membership for a ratification vote,” said Scott Green, president of the NFLRA. “We are glad to be getting back on the field for this week’s games.”

Press Release

The NFL and the NFL Referees Association agreed tonight to the terms of a new eight-year collective bargaining agreement that will return the game officials to the field for this weekend’s games, beginning with Thursday night’s Cleveland at Baltimore game.

The agreement, the longest with the game officials in NFL history, was reached in New York between the negotiating teams for the NFL and the NFLRA with the assistance of Scot Beckenbaugh and Peter Donatello of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The agreement must be ratified by the NFLRA membership. Under the commissioner’s authority, Commissioner Goodell can enter into this agreement without a vote of the NFL clubs.

Commissioner Goodell temporarily lifted the lockout so that the officials can work Thursday night’s Cleveland at Baltimore game prior to their ratification vote. The officials will meet Friday and Saturday to vote on the agreement.  If it is approved, a clinic for the officials will be held following the vote.

“The long-term future of our game requires that we seek improvement in every area, including officiating,” Commissioner Goodell said. “This agreement supports long-term reforms that will make officiating better. The teams, players and fans want and deserve both consistency and quality in officiating.”

“We look forward to having the finest officials in sports back on the field, and I want to give a special thanks to NFL fans for their passion. Now it’s time to put the focus back on the teams and players where it belongs.”

The agreement includes the following key terms:

– Eight-year term covering the 2012-2019 seasons.

– The current defined benefit pension plan will remain in place for current officials through the 2016 season (or until the official earns 20 years of service). The defined benefit plan will then be frozen.

– Retirement benefits will be provided for new hires, and for all officials beginning in 2017, through a defined contribution arrangement, which will have two elements:  an annual league contribution made on behalf of each game official that will begin with an average of more than $18,000 per official and increase to more than $23,000 per official in 2019, and a partial match on any additional contribution that an official makes to his 401(k) account.

– Apart from their benefit package, the game officials’ compensation will increase from an average of $149,000 a year in 2011 to $173,000 in 2013, rising to $205,000 by 2019.

– Beginning with the 2013 season, the NFL will have the option of hiring a number of officials on a full-time basis to work year-round, including on the field.

– The NFL will have the option to retain additional officials for training and development purposes, and may assign those additional officials to work NFL games. The number of additional officials will be determined by the NFL.


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2012 NFL Free Agency FAQ

Posted by Duke Bobber on March 12, 2012 – 11:25 am

Salary cap set at $120,600,000

Q.  When does the 2012 free agency signing period begin?
A.  At 4:00 PM ET on Tuesday, March 13.

Q.  What are the categories of free agency?
A.  Players are either “restricted” or “unrestricted” free agents.  Within the categories are also “franchise” and “transition” players.

Q.  What is the time period for free agency signings this year?
A.  For restricted free agents, from March 13 to April 20.  For unrestricted free agents who have received the June 1 tender from their prior Club, from March 13 to July 22 (or the first scheduled day of the first NFL training camp, whichever is later).  For franchise players, from March 13 until the Tuesday following the 10th week of the regular season, November 13.  If a franchise player does not sign by November 13, he must sit out the season.  There are no transition player designations this year.

Q.  What is the difference between a restricted free agent and an unrestricted free agent?
AIn the 2012 League Year, players with three accrued seasons become restricted free agents when their contracts expire.  Unrestricted free agents have completed four or more accrued seasons.  An unrestricted free agent is free to sign with any club with no draft choice compensation owed to his old club.

Q.  What constitutes an “accrued season”?
A.  Six or more regular-season games on a club’s active/inactive, reserved/injured or reserve/physically unable to perform lists.

Q.  Other than accrued seasons, what determines a restricted free agent?
A.  He has received a “qualifying offer” (a salary tender predetermined by the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the league and its players) from his old club.  He can negotiate with any club through April 20.  If the restricted free agent signs an offer sheet with a new club, his old club can match the offer and retain him because it has a “right of first refusal.”  If the old club does not match the offer, it may receive draft choice compensation depending on the amount of its qualifying offer.  If an offer sheet is not executed on or before April 20, the player’s negotiating rights revert exclusively to his old club.

Q.  What determines an unrestricted free agent?
A.  A player with four or more accrued seasons whose contract has expired.  He is free to sign with any club, with no draft choice compensation owed to his old club, through July 22 (or the first scheduled day of the first NFL training camp, whichever is later).  At that point, his negotiating rights revert exclusively to his old club if by June 1 the old club tendered the player a one-year contract for 110 percent of  his prior year’s salary.  His old club then has until the Tuesday following the 10th week of the regular season (November 13) to sign him.  If he does not sign by that date, he must sit out the season.  If no tender is offered by June 1, the player can be signed by any club at any time throughout the season.

Q.  What determines a franchise player?
A.  The salary offer by a player’s club determines what type of franchise player he is: exclusive or non-exclusive.

An “exclusive” franchise player – not free to sign with another club – is offered the greater of (i) the average of the top five salaries at the player’s position for the current year as of the end of the Restricted Free Agent Signing Period on April 20; or (ii) the amount of the Required Tender for a non exclusive franchise player, as explained below.

The methodology for calculating the Required Tender for a non exclusive franchise player has changed.  Formerly, such players were tendered a one year NFL Player Contract for the average of the five largest Prior Year Salaries for players at the position at which the Franchise Player played the most games during the prior League Year, or 120% of his Prior Year Salary, whichever is greater.

Article 10, Section 2(a)(i) of the CBA sets forth the new methodology, known as the “Cap Percentage Average,” for calculating the Required Tender for such a player:

The Nonexclusive Franchise Tender shall be a one year NFL Player Contract for (A) the average of the five largest Prior Year Salaries for players at the position . . . at which the Franchise Player participated in the most plays [formerly, “games”] during the prior League Year, which average shall be calculated by: (1) summing the amounts of the Franchise Tags for players at that position for the five preceding League Years; (2) dividing the resulting amount by the sum of the Salary Caps for the five preceding League Years . . . ; and (3) multiplying the resulting percentage by the Salary Cap for the upcoming League Year . . . (the “Cap Percentage Average”) . . . ; or (B) 120% of his Prior Year Salary, whichever is greater . . . .

If a club extends a Required Tender to a non exclusive franchise player pursuant to this section, the player shall be permitted to negotiate a player contract with any club, except that draft choice compensation of two first-round draft selections shall be made in the event he signs with a new club.

Q.  How many franchise and transition players can a team designate each season?
A.  A club can designate one “franchise” player or one “transition” player among its potential free agents.

Q.  Can a club decide to withdraw its franchise or transition designations on a player?
A.  Yes.  A club can withdraw its franchise or transition designation and the player then automatically becomes an unrestricted free agent, either immediately or when his contract expires.

Q.  After withdrawing the designation, can a club then designate another player?
ANot in the 2012 season.

Q.  What is the salary cap for 2012?
A.  The salary cap is $120,600,000 per club.

Q.  When do teams have to be in compliance with that number and be under the cap?
A.  At the start of the 2012 League Year, which begins at 4:00 p.m. ET on March 13.

Q.  If a team is under the salary cap at the end of a given season, can the team carry over room to the next season?
A.  Yes.  A team may “carry over” room from one League Year to the following League Year by submitting notice to the NFL prior to 4:00 p.m. ET on the day before the team’s final regular-season game indicating the maximum amount of room that the club wishes to carry over.

Q.  What is the maximum amount of room that a club can carry over?
A.  One hundred percent of its remaining room.


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